intervention

Mindfulness Meditation Part 3

Posted on Actualizado enn

SCIENCE & MINDFULNESS MEDITATION

In the study of Jain et al., 2007, they compared two brief (1 month) stress-reduction intervention. One based on relaxation and the other based on mindfulness meditation. Both therapies were successful in alleviating overall psychological distress.Mindfulnees course part 3

Positive states of mind are defined by focused attention, productivity, responsible care taking, restful response, sharing sensuous nonsexual pleasure and sensuous sexual pleasure (Adler et al., 1998). Stress may impair capacities to experience positives states of mind.

Jain et al., also demostrated that the mindfulness meditation group reduced effectively rumination and distraction compared to the relaxation group. Teasdale et al., 1995, demostrate that mindfulness meditation interventions may prevent depressive relapse by reducing rumination. Reducing rumination could be included as a cognitive tool in therapies.

HOW TO MEDITATE

  • SEAT IN FRONT OF A WHITE WALL.
  • FOCUS ON ENLARGING THE EXPIRATION.
  • STAY ON THE FIVE MINUTES EVERY DAY: IF TIME GOES SLOWLY, KEEP CALM, IT’S ONLY A MIRAGE.
  • DON’T TRY TO DO NOTHING MORE. MEDITATION IT’S EASY!!

References:

Adler, N. E., Horowitz, M., Garcia, A., & Moyer, A. (1998). Additional validation of a scale to assess positive states of mind. Psychosomatic Medicine, 60(1), 26-32.

Jain, S., Shapiro, S. L., Swanick, S., Roesch, S. C., Mills, P. J., Bell, I., & Schwartz, G. E. R. (2007). A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation versus relaxation training: Effects on distress, positive states of mind, rumination, and distraction. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 33(1), 11-21. doi:10.1207/s15324796abm3301_2

Teasdale, J. D., Segal, Z., & Williams, J. M. (1995). How does cognitive therapy prevent depressive relapse and why should attentional control (mindfulness) training help? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33(1), 25-39.

Efficacy of reading intervention

Posted on Actualizado enn

Intervention for poor readers with reading delay are based on two ideas: the first one is to improve phonological awareness and the second one is to improve reading comprehension. Today we report a study from Hatcher et al., 2006, which talks about the efficacy of a small reading intervention with beginning readers with reading-delay. The intervention was delivered in daily www.telepsicologiainfantil.comtwenty minutes sessions. The program combine phonemic awareness training, word and test reading, and phonological linkage exercices. They found a difference between the control group and the group who received the intervention. Children made significantly more progress on letter knowledge, single word reading and phoneme awareness. Poor initial literacy skills seem to predict the failure of the intervention. Also around one quarter of the children didn’t respond to the intervention and seem to need more intensive help.

Intervention for reading comprehension improvement tend to focus on the next activities:

  • Identification of main ideas or thematic

  • Construction of inference

  • Construction of abstracting

  • Self-monitoring of reading comprehension

  • Graphic organizers

  • Generation of self-questioning

In the study of Ripoll and Aguado (2013) they conclude that interventions based on teaching strategies, increasing vocabulary and increasing motivation for reading or decoding, have shown signifcant effects on reading comprehension of spanish speaking students. Another interesting conclusion is that reciprocal teaching seems to be a good method for teaching reading comprehension strategies.

In another study from Hacther et al., (2006), they evaluate the effectiveness of the UK Early Literacy (ELS) programme relative to a programme of reading intervention based on “sound linkage”. In this study they compare the effectivity between training phonemic awareness or training letter-sound knowledge. They conclude that both interventions have equivalent gains in reading and spelling.

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References

Hatcher, P. J., Goetz, K., Snowling, M. J., Hulme, C., Gibbs, S., & Smith, G. (2006). Evidence for the effectiveness of the Early Literacy Support programme. The British journal of educational psychology, 76(Pt 2), 351-367. doi:10.1348/000709905X39170

Hatcher, P. J., Hulme, C., Miles, J. N. V., Carroll, J. M., Hatcher, J., Gibbs, S., … Snowling, M. J. (2006). Efficacy of small group reading intervention for beginning readers with reading-delay: a randomised controlled trial. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47(8), 820–827. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2005.01559.x

Ripoll, J. C., & Aguado, G. (2013). Reading Comprehension Improvement for Spanish Students: A Meta-Analysis // La mejora de la comprensión lectora en español: Un meta-análisis. Revista de Psicodidáctica / Journal of Psychodidactics, 0(0). Recuperado a partir de http://www.ehu.es/ojs/index.php/psicodidactica/article/view/9001