mind

Mindfulness Meditation Part 4

Posted on Actualizado enn

SCIENCE & MINDFULNESS MEDITATION

In mindfulness practice, we have found two main attentional mechanisms. The first one is centered on focused attention. The exercise consist to focus your attention to an object, usually the object is your breathing.

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The second one is centered on open attention. The exercise consists of an observation of the mental flow but without any identification; as if you were a mental observer of your own ideas and feelings.

mindfulness 4_2

In the study of Moore et al., 2012, they demonstrate that regular and brief mindfulness meditation practice improves the capacity of self-regulation of attention. Meditation group perform better on the Stroop test task. Reaction time was better in the meditation group than in the control group. We hypothesized that working of sustained attention could improve inhibition of response.

HOW TO MEDITATE

  • SEAT WITH THE BOTTON OF THE FOOT TOTALLY IN CONTACT WITH THE FLOOR.
  • FOCUS ON TO EXPIRATE WITH YOUR MOUTH.
  • STAY WITH FIVE MINUTS EVERY DAY: MORNING? AFTERNOON? IT DOESN´T MATTER!! JUST DO IT.
  • DON´T TRY TO EVALUATE YOUR PROGRESSSION. IT´S NORMAL THAT NOTHING HAPPENS.

References:

Jha, A. P., Krompinger, J., & Baime, M. J. (2007). Mindfulness training modifies subsystems of attention. Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, 7(2), 109-119. doi:10.3758/CABN.7.2.109

Moore, A., Gruber, T., Derose, J., & Malinowski, P. (2012). Regular, brief mindfulness meditation practice improves electrophysiological markers of attentional control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2012.00018

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Mindfulness Meditation Part 3

Posted on Actualizado enn

SCIENCE & MINDFULNESS MEDITATION

In the study of Jain et al., 2007, they compared two brief (1 month) stress-reduction intervention. One based on relaxation and the other based on mindfulness meditation. Both therapies were successful in alleviating overall psychological distress.Mindfulnees course part 3

Positive states of mind are defined by focused attention, productivity, responsible care taking, restful response, sharing sensuous nonsexual pleasure and sensuous sexual pleasure (Adler et al., 1998). Stress may impair capacities to experience positives states of mind.

Jain et al., also demostrated that the mindfulness meditation group reduced effectively rumination and distraction compared to the relaxation group. Teasdale et al., 1995, demostrate that mindfulness meditation interventions may prevent depressive relapse by reducing rumination. Reducing rumination could be included as a cognitive tool in therapies.

HOW TO MEDITATE

  • SEAT IN FRONT OF A WHITE WALL.
  • FOCUS ON ENLARGING THE EXPIRATION.
  • STAY ON THE FIVE MINUTES EVERY DAY: IF TIME GOES SLOWLY, KEEP CALM, IT’S ONLY A MIRAGE.
  • DON’T TRY TO DO NOTHING MORE. MEDITATION IT’S EASY!!

References:

Adler, N. E., Horowitz, M., Garcia, A., & Moyer, A. (1998). Additional validation of a scale to assess positive states of mind. Psychosomatic Medicine, 60(1), 26-32.

Jain, S., Shapiro, S. L., Swanick, S., Roesch, S. C., Mills, P. J., Bell, I., & Schwartz, G. E. R. (2007). A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation versus relaxation training: Effects on distress, positive states of mind, rumination, and distraction. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 33(1), 11-21. doi:10.1207/s15324796abm3301_2

Teasdale, J. D., Segal, Z., & Williams, J. M. (1995). How does cognitive therapy prevent depressive relapse and why should attentional control (mindfulness) training help? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33(1), 25-39.